The Right Way for a Catholic to Celebrate the 4th Mass & Eucharistic Adoration

Today is the 4th of July there were a lot of parades going on, a lot of cookouts and as I type this there is a new Grille on my back deck purchased today just waiting to be used for the very first time and tonight there will be a ton of fireworks before the day ends and the people who work 3rd shift like me, go back to work to officially close the holiday.

Now there is nothing wrong with cookouts and fireworks and parades and I dearly hope that you enjoyed them, but when it comes down to it I think the best example of what the 4th of July is came from the three things that I do almost every Monday that I have or will do today.

  1. I said my prayers

There is a series of prayers that I do every day A sequence of invocations to mine and other guardian angels, a divine mercy chaplet for my City by ward, A special abbreviated 11 decade Rosary of my own design for particular intentions, A full 20 decade Rosary, A Chaplet of Divine Mercy for the sick and dying (usually before the blessed sacrament) and four scripture readings. On days when I work I start these prayers at midnight, Continue them at 3 AM and then finish them before I get home. On days I don’t work it’s a little less regimented and I do some of them on the fly but with rare exceptions I generally get them in every day.

  1. I went to Mass

Many non Catholics are not aware that while most Catholics only attend the obligatory Sunday mass or saturday vigil Catholics celebrate Mass every single day. This morning I went to the 8 AM mass at St. Bernard’s at St. Camillus parish. We heard the scripture for Monday of the Fourteenth Week in Ordinary Time a reading from Hosea, a snippet from Psalm 145 and the Gospel Matthew Chapter 9. The sermon was on the mercy of Christ. Because this is a holy year When mass was finished I went to St. Joseph Parish, went through the Holy Doors and then proceeded to the old South Street Cemetery to say the prayers to earn a Plenary Indulgence for a family buried there in the early 1800 before heading home.

  1. I’m going to Eucharistic Adoration.

The very moment this post is published I will be heading back to St. Bernard’s at St. Camillus to the Divine Mercy Chapel and take my weekly hour of Eucharistic Adoration which I do every Monday from 6 PM to 7 PM. I’ll pray, read scripture, read catholic material and just spend some time with Christ, present in the blessed sacrament.

Now all of those things seem rather ordinary but when you think about it it is the perfect way to celebrate the the of July.

One of the founding principles of this nation is religious liberty. The ability to worship openly and freely (or not) in public, in private and in church is a bedrock of our freedoms. And while many are doing their best to take that freedom away or put it in a box for their own purposes (Someone anyone find me the words freedom from religion in the Constitution) right now that freedom still exists.

And what is the use of a right if you don’t exercise it?

So today, if you are Catholic or Protestant take some time to thank God for all he has done for you, because in doing so you are celebrating the anniversary of our nation in the best way possible, by exercising your God given rights!